Monday, May 12, 2014

LAB HOURS

2 hours: i helped out at the museum for the exhibit and helped close it
40 mins: measuring my objects and making sure i got the measurements right
6 hrs: i spent so much time in my research of the objects. some where impossible to find i swear. with all this work i would have expected to have found more information on all the objects but it was just hard to even find the origin of some

Friday, May 9, 2014

WOOOO

Done with my objects, so much harder than i thought and so tedious!! The hardest one is the bamboo stick took me forever. it was not a nose flute from the looks of it although i included a picture of one.

Monday, May 5, 2014

research



i think i found the bamboo stick artifact. looks more and more like a nose flute but im confused for about the beads

Sunday, May 4, 2014

LAB HOURS

6 HRS: did a lot of research online and went to the library but did not really find anything for my artifacts. so far all i have is info on the northwest coast basket lid. everything else is pretty much up in the air

Saturday, May 3, 2014

artifact research

im having a lot of trouble finding anything on the bamboo stick with beads and a chain. i cant find anything on it. any suggestion on how to go about finding an object with unknown origin. maybe i should look into beads?

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Artifact research

did any one else get any baskets. i have a basket with swastika designs that from research was probably made by the pomo native americans. also i have a bamboo stick with beads that is of unknown origin. could not find anything on it.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Rapartition

1. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the 
control of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 
that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 
U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    In 1930, a cultural item was removed from Queen Creek Ruin, also 
known as Sonoqui Pueblo, Pozos de Sonoqui, or Sun Temple Ruin (site AZ 
U:14:48(ASM)/SACATON:2:6(GP)) in Maricopa County, AZ, during legally 
authorized excavations conducted by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. The 
item was reportedly found in association with a human burial, but the 
human remains are not present in the collections. In December 1950, the 
Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the item was donated to the Arizona 
State Museum. In 1953, the cultural item was transferred to the Field 
Museum of Natural History as a permanent loan. In 2013, the Field 
Museum transferred control of the item back to the Arizona State 
Museum. The unassociated funerary object is a stone bowl.
http://www.nps.gov/history/NAGPRA/FED_NOTICES/NAGPRADIR/nir0621.html

2. Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the 
possession of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, 
AZ, that meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural 
patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice. 
    In August 1912, Arizona State Museum Director Byron Cummings 
collected nine prayer sticks (catalog nos. 87a-c, 88a-c, 89a-c) and 
three prayer plumes (catalog no. 90a-c) from a Hopi Snake Dance at 
Oraibi, and six prayer plumes (catalog no. 91a-f) from a Hopi Flute 
Dance at Mishongnovi. In 1915, Dr. Cummings acquired four Hopi women's 
dance wands (catalog nos. 85a & b, 86a & b) at Oraibi. In 1919, Dr. 
Cummings collected a prayer offering (catalog no. 3973) at a Hopi 
village. Also in 1919, Dr. Cummings purchased four women's dance wands 
(catalog nos. 3899-3902) from Mrs. Elizabeth Stanley. In August 1920, 
Dr. Cummings collected a feather headdress (catalog no. 3975), a gourd 
rattle (catalog no. 3976), a tortoise shell leg rattle (catalog no. 
3994), four anklets (catalog nos. 3983a & b, 3984a & b), a leather 
girdle (catalog no. 3987), four armbands (catalog nos. 3995a & b, 3996a 
& b), a necklace (catalog no. 3993), and a dance kilt (catalog no. 
5436) that had been used by a Hopi Snake Priest at the village of 
Walpi. In 1923, Dr. Cummings collected a feather bundle (catalog no. 
3974) from a Hopi village, a feather headdress (catalog no. 3977) from 
a Hopi Buffalo Dance, and a cornhusk ceremonial tiara (catalog no. 
13136) at Walpi. In 1931, Dr. Cummings collected a feather wand 
(catalog no. 5588) at a Hopi village. All of the objects collected by 
Dr. Cummings were subsequently accessioned by the Arizona State Museum.
http://www.nps.gov/history/NAGPRA/FED_NOTICES/NAGPRADIR/nir0613.html

3.   The Grand Rapids Public Museum, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet 
the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the 
Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come 
forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated
  At an unknown date, one unassociated funerary object was removed 
from a mound at an unknown location in Kentucky and acquired by the 
Grand Rapids Public Museum from a source with the initials ``K.S.I.'' 
(lentified in the museum records as a ``[w]aterbottle of sundried 
(probably Peruvian Indian make) clay for burial with dead S (W?), KY.'' 
Digital images of the object were reviewed by the Chickasaw Nation 
Preservation and Repatriation Department and a professor at Murray 
State University. It was determined that this vessel was identical to a 
human effigy vessel from Wickcliffe Mounds, KY, and likely affiliated 
with the Chickasaw Nation. In the Great Chickasaw Cession of 1818, 
lands were ceded in western Kentucky to the U.S. Government and 
traditional tribal hunting and trading routes covered a large portion 
of Kentucky. Therefore, it is conceivable that this stone human effigy 
vessel is culturally affiliated with the Chickasaw Nation.
    In May and November of 1912, one lot of unassociated funerary 
objects was removed from an unknown location near Tupelo in Lee County, 
MS, by W. C. Wyman. At an unknown date, the lot of unassociated 
funerary objects was sold to Dr. Ruth Herrick by an unknown person. In 
1974, the lot of unassociated funerary objects was bequeathed to the 
Grand Rapids Public Museum by Dr. Ruth Herrick. The lot of unassociated 
funerary objects is identified in the Grand Rapids Public Museum's 
records as ``large beads, glass, shell, and bone, early trade beads.'' 
Digital images of these objects were reviewed by the Chickasaw Nation 
Preservation and Repatriation Department, who determined that these 
objects are likely affiliated with the Chickasaw Nation.ikely Kent Scientific Institute, the former name of the Grand Rapids Public Museum). 
http://www.nps.gov/history/NAGPRA/FED_NOTICES/NAGPRADIR/nir0611.html